IIUC Notes – Wildcards for Destination Patterns

As always, feel free to correct anything that needs correcting or add anything that needs adding.  There is a lot more to the full definition of wildcards, but these are the basics.  Note to *nix guys:  This isn't regex as you understand it.  Yes, the use of curly braces would be nice, but we don't get that here.

T:  Represents anywhere from 0 to 32 digits

destination-patter 9T  <- matches a 9 followed by 0 – 32 other digits

Period : Represents a single digit

destination-pattern 3…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with a 3
destination-pattern 91802…….   <- Matches a 12-digit number starting with 91802

Plus : Matches from 1 to 32 instances of the previous digit or pattern

destination-pattern 85+   <- matches an 8 followed by 1 to 32 5s
destination-pattern 1+  <- matches 1 to 32 instances of the digit 1

Percent or question mark :  Matches from 0 to 32 instances of the previous digit or pattern

destination-pattern 74%   <- matches a 7 followed by 0 to 32 4s
destination-pattern 84

Brackets : Matches a range or group of digits

destination-pattern [2-4]…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with 2, 3, or 4
destination-pattern [159]…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with 1, 5 or 9

Parenthesis :  Groups digits together to match with a +, ?, or %

destination-pattern (61)+   <- matches 61, 6161, 616161…up to 32 61s
destination-pattern(555)+   <- matches 555, 555555…up to 32 555s

Remember to think about digit stripping if you're using these on POTS dial peers.  The directive no digit-strip may help you out.

Aaron Conaway

I shake my head around sometimes and see what falls out. That's what lands on these pages. @aconaway@mstdn.social

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