IIUC Notes – Wildcards for Destination Patterns

As always, feel free to correct anything that needs correcting or add anything that needs adding.  There is a lot more to the full definition of wildcards, but these are the basics.  Note to *nix guys:  This isn't regex as you understand it.  Yes, the use of curly braces would be nice, but we don't get that here.

T:  Represents anywhere from 0 to 32 digits

destination-patter 9T  <- matches a 9 followed by 0 – 32 other digits

Period : Represents a single digit

destination-pattern 3…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with a 3
destination-pattern 91802…….   <- Matches a 12-digit number starting with 91802

Plus : Matches from 1 to 32 instances of the previous digit or pattern

destination-pattern 85+   <- matches an 8 followed by 1 to 32 5s
destination-pattern 1+  <- matches 1 to 32 instances of the digit 1

Percent or question mark :  Matches from 0 to 32 instances of the previous digit or pattern

destination-pattern 74%   <- matches a 7 followed by 0 to 32 4s
destination-pattern 84

Brackets : Matches a range or group of digits

destination-pattern [2-4]…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with 2, 3, or 4
destination-pattern [159]…   <- matches a 4-digit number that begins with 1, 5 or 9

Parenthesis :  Groups digits together to match with a +, ?, or %

destination-pattern (61)+   <- matches 61, 6161, 616161…up to 32 61s
destination-pattern(555)+   <- matches 555, 555555…up to 32 555s

Remember to think about digit stripping if you're using these on POTS dial peers.  The directive no digit-strip may help you out.

Aaron Conaway

I shake my head around sometimes and see what falls out. That's what lands on these pages. If you have any questions, the best way to contact me is through Twitter at @aconaway.

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